Making Homemade Einkorn Bread

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Einkorn, an ancient strain of wheat similar to spelt and emmer, appeared on a documentary I recently watched about the sustainability of current farm practices, including the growing of wheat. (This one! Right here! Its called Sustainable.)

Why is einkorn important?

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Einkorn is a grain that promotes genetic diversity in the grain crop, which helps nearly every element of the farm from the land and animals, to the crop itself. Regular wheat is one single strain of grain that is constantly mass produced, draining the soil, forcing the use of pesticides, and losing nutrition from the wheat itself.

On the other hand, a grain like einkorn helps restore the soil, and because it is genetically diverse, limits the need for the protection from bugs or disease that pesticides provide. It also hasn’t lost its nutrient value like regular wheat has. Eating einkorn provides more protein and potassium (along with other nutrients) than regular wheat.

The documentary discussed how this kind of wheat grows so well and interviewed a baker who uses einkorn in his bakery every day. I was very curious to try some einkorn bread of my own, so yesterday I made my first loaf. (In the future I’d also like to make more bread using other kinds of ancient grains! The taste is similar to whole-wheat bread, rather than regular white bread flour, which is exactly what I love from my bread).

How to make einkorn bread:

I followed this recipe from Live Simply.

The ingredients are very simple:

Water, yeast, olive oil, honey, and salt along with all-purpose einkorn flour. (You may use whole wheat, but the author of the recipe, Kristin Marr, suggests using the all-purpose for this particular recipe.)

After the yeast has been activated, the ingredients combine quickly into a sticky dough. It is important to not overwork the einkorn dough because it won’t rise correctly if you do.

The bread then proves for an hour before another 30-minute prove in the loaf container. Finally, it goes into the over at 375 for about 35 minutes. When I pulled my loaf from the oven, I was initially worried it was burnt. Actually, it really wasn’t burnt (well, maybe just a tiny bit on the very top), since the einkorn flour turns a darker color after it has been baked.

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Overall, this first try at making einkorn bread was a success! I definitely want to make another loaf, since this one is mostly gone already and I plan to eat the rest with some homemade soup tonight. This particular recipe doesn’t make an overly sweet or salty bread, so it goes well with nearly any dish.

Here is some more information about einkorn!

 

The Underground Girls of Kabul (An Inside Look into the Lives of Afghan Women)

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The Underground Girls of Kabul, written by journalist Jenny Nordberg, is a look into Afgan culture and the lives of Afgan women. Nordberg specifically explores the phenomenon of families dressing their daughters as boys, or bacha posh.

In Afganistan, a girl child is called “dokhtar” (daughter) while the boy is “bacha” (child). The girl is not the chosen child, she is “other”. The phrase “bacha posh” means “dressed like a boy” and is the term for those children who are neither son nor daughter. They are the girls dressed as boys.

Before reading this book I assumed it might be a heart-wrenching look into the confined lives of Afgan women, but this book proves over and over how much of a falsehood that thought was. In many ways, Afgan women are indeed mistreated and confined, but this book is a hopeful look at how their society might be transformed and is in the process of transforming right now.  The presence and existence of these girls proves there is a kind of resistance to the control of society and a subversion of the tightly controlled roles and rules surrounding the behavior of women.

Reading this book also helped to open my eyes to the actual culture of Afganistan and its people and history. To be honest, I hadn’t read that much about Afgan culture before this and I was surprised in many ways to hear stories from the women themselves. Of course, there are some truly horrible and saddening moments in the book, but I understand more clearly why their society behaves this way.

For example, one eye-opening moment for me was when Nordberg points out that in some ways the West is more obsessed with gender roles (in childhood) than Afghans are. A woman she interviewed explains that, in Afghanistan, “people are driven by something much more basic- sexuality. Everything before puberty is just preparation for procreation. That is the purpose of life here.”

Part of the reason that Afghan culture keeps women so tightly confined is that they are in a constant state of war. When everything else is unstable, the Afghan men keep a tight grip on any reasons they have, specifically their reputation and their women. Controlling women means that, to an extent, they have control over life- the literal production of life which can mean safety and future security for their family.

Nordberg’s suggestions in the epilogue of the book as to how Afghanistan can move out of this cultural mindset include two important factors, that the country must enter a sustained time of peace, and that part of the change must begin with “powerful men educating many other men”. The women in Afghanistan won’t be able to achieve economic or political power until they are supported by their fathers and husbands.

This book really changed my perspective on Afghan culture and the Middle East. Nordberg helped me understand a little more clearly what living on the inside of such a culture looks like. Ultimately, there is great potential for hope and progress, but the road towards that goal will be long and difficult.

 

 

Vegan Chocolate Chip Cookies

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On Friday last week I made my first batch of vegan chocolate chip cookies to take with me to a dinner party. They were so easy and fast to make, and they tasted delicious! I also brought the extras in to work the next day—my coworkers loved them too! It’s a nice feeling to know that more people might be able to eat your dessert if they have lactose issues or adhere to a vegan diet.

I followed this recipe.

Ingredients:

2/3 cup refined coconut oil, melted

2/3 cup vegan granulated sugar

2/3 cup packed vegan brown sugar

1/2 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk

teaspoons vanilla

2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

teaspoon baking soda

teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

bag (10 oz) vegan semisweet chocolate chips (1 1/2 cups)

 

However, I’d like to make another batch soon with some chopped walnuts added for a bit of extra crunch and nuttiness.

The steps, posted below, only took a few minutes to follow. (And you can safely eat the dough because there aren’t any eggs! Not that the presence of eggs stopped me before…)

 

  • Heat oven to 350°F. In large bowl, mix coconut oil, granulated sugar and brown sugar until well mixed. Stir in almond milk and vanilla.
  • Stir in flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt until dough forms. Stir in chocolate chips. Drop dough by slightly rounded tablespoonfuls 2 inches apart onto ungreased cookie sheets.
  • Bake 11 to 14 minutes or until edges are light brown and tops look set. Cool 1 minute on cookie sheets. Remove to cooling rack; cool completely. Store in tightly covered container.

 

Recently, I’ve been trying to learn how to bake more vegan desserts and have had a lot of success with both banana bread and apple cake. It turns out that great dessert doesn’t need milk and eggs, it just needs a lot of sugar.

Cheers to baking!

-Sarah

The Book Life: Comparing Bookstores and Libraries

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I recently started a job at a library, meaning that I now work two jobs that leave me surrounded by books. Stacks of them. Shelves of them.

Picture books are returned slightly sticky from young fingers.

The recipe books leave me feeling hungry.

cookbook        everday korean      milkbar life

I spend my time shelving, putting books on hold, and searching for that one book about knitting someone requested. I also see endless amounts of crappy romance novels. The tagline of the day: “Scot rhymes with HOT!” (Yes, it was a romance set in Scotland, if you haven’t guessed it already.)

 

My other job surrounded by books is at a bookstore.

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I love how, by necessity, small bookstores can only offer a curated selection of books. Some of these are the kind you buy to show to others, the ones with the beautiful photography. The ones you keep on a coffee table on a kitchen counter. The travel books and cookbooks.

Some of these books are memoirs, academic books, textbooks, picture books, or religious books. These are the bestselling books, the ones the store hopes it can make a profit on.

Books at a bookstore are in pristine condition and are meant to be bought and brought home to find a place on your bookshelves.

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Here, I spend my time helping customers find books and selling them books at the register.

Here, a book might be on sale or 25% off or even as a $5 fiction book. Also here is where some books might be $40 or more (I’m talking about textbooks or books with an expensive binding). Things can start to add up.

A busy day at the bookstore means there was a lot of people. A busy day at the library means there was a lot of books.

Here are the major differences and similarities between the two:

  1. Bookstores are fundamentally a retail setting. This means that there is always some transfer of money happening for the products (and no, I don’t have control over the prices.)
  2. Libraries work as a circulation system, not a one-time sale. There is a constant flow of books going out and coming back in. Unlike the bookstore, the circulation system in the library is constantly flowing and there is almost always more books to be reshelved.
  3. Both host authors and events. And summer reading programs!
  4. Both engage and encourage the community, in slightly different ways. A library is fully open to the community for meetings, but a bookstore can more easily show a movie or host live music.
  5. Both open discussions, spread information and promote learning.
  6. Customer service is very important in both settings. (I was forced to watch a training video on this very subject called “Give ‘em the Pickle”).

In the end, even if being around books every day and can get a little bit tiring, I love seeing what people are reading. I love being part of the process to help people engage with new ideas and stories. I love working at places people can come to get work done or research or just read and relax.

 

So, for now, I’ll just be over here. Living the book life.

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Everything Happens for a Reason (A Look at Dealing with Tragedy)

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The book Everything Happens for a Reason (and Other Lies I’ve Loved) is a memoir by Kate Bowler about her life after being diagnosed with stage IV colon cancer. Her heavy, beautiful writing discusses her view of faith in the face of tragedy and living life when your sense of certainty has been completely stripped away.

Bowler was a professor at Duke Divinity School, mother of a two-year-old, and wife to the love of her life when she was told she had cancer and had only two years left to live. Her diagnosis ripped away her old life immediately and left her wondering how to live in the face of death.

This book is a perfectly paced story, carefully balancing all the darkest moments with snippets of information and daily life which makes it all bearable. For example, at the end of chapter two, “Object Lesson”, we learn that Bowler had previously had a miscarriage. This moment is one of the heaviest and most heart-breaking in the book. As Bowler shares this moment she says:

“I felt something strange and ran to the bathroom. I started to scream for Toban. As I sat crouched there, everything moved around me in a blur…When we had said all we could say and I had cried all I could cry, we stood there like fools, without language or focus… I could not look down. I was nothing but blood and water.”

But the next chapter begins again with something much more light-hearted: a magic show that Bowler attends wither her friend Blair. By taking the reader from one scene of heartbreak to another, lighter scene, Bowler is able to make this memoir readable and meaningful rather than overwhelming.

Another key part of this book is the two appendixes giving advice on how to interact with someone going through a tragedy. The first appendix, “Absolutely never say this to people experiencing terrible times: a short list”, is full of things to not say to someone (even if you think you are being relatable). Number 5 on the list is the lie “Everything happens for a reason” to which Bowler says:

“The only thing worse than saying this is pretending that you know the reason. So if people tell you this, make sure you are there when they go through the cruelest moments of their lives, and start offering you own [reasons]. When someone is drowning, the only thing worse than failing to throw them a life preserver is handing them a reason.”

The second appendix contains suggestions for positive, helpful ways to interact with someone going through rough times. It includes items like “Oh, my friend, that sounds so hard.” and “I’d love to bring you a meal this week. Can I email you about it?”

Bowler writes about her tragedy and her faith in such a beautiful, vulnerable way. At the very end of this memoir she writes:

“My little plans are crumbs scattered on the ground. This is all I have learned about living here, plodding along, and finding God. My well-laid plans are no longer my foundation. I can only hope that my dreams, my actions, my hopes are leaving a trail for Zach and Toban, so, whichever way the path turns, all they will find is Love.

Zach is beside me in our big bed as I write these words, rolling around like a polar bear cub… It’s another beautiful morning, and it’s time to yell with the pitch of the coffee grinder and make him French toast. I will die, yes, but not today.”

If you are looking for a memoir exploring life during (and through) personal tragedy, Bowler’s Everything Happens for a Reason is excellent and honest. I loved it!

The Calculus of Change

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The Calculus of Change by Jessie Hilb follows Aden through her senior year of high school as she meets, and immediately falls for a Jewish boy named Tate. This novel confronts real teenage issues in an honest way, letting the characters make mistakes and deal with the consequences. Nothing in life is perfect, and this book reflects that.

The Calculus of Change begins with math. Calculus, actually. Aden loves calculus and the idea of “infinitesimal change”.

“Small changes in several steps makes sense to me because it feels like I can somehow control it. I am in charge of getting numbers and symbols where they need to go… What I can’t control in real life is the sudden, catastrophic change that often comes without steps or warning and makes life insufferably different. Like a dead mom. Calculus? Calculus is change I can wrap my head around.”

Throughout the novel we see Aden dealing with body image issues and the ideas of change and control. At the beginning of the book, Aden is desperately trying to keep things under control in her family as she helps her brother with his relationships and walks carefully around her dad’s mood swings. She slowly comes to realize that there are many things in life that can’t be controlled; like your mom dying of cancer.

On the other hand, she also realizes just how many things she can control—like choosing to love herself and make healthy decisions to deal with grief and her relationship with Tate.

Just compare these two parts of the book, one from the beginning and one from the end:

“[Maggie’s] wearing a loose, high-cut top and leggings, and I can see her thin—her stomach—because her arms are reaching up to wrap around Tate’s neck. My eyes water involuntarily at the sight of them together. Kissing.”

“This transformation—it’s like I’ve finally found a way to anchor my body to my soul…. What I see isn’t perfect, but it’s mine. And as I look at myself, I think, I look beautiful because I’m strong.” 

I will say that this book left me feeling a little sad. Not all of my questions got answered (not because it was a bad ending, but because life changes can only happen one at a time) and not everything was perfectly happy. But Aden’s growth was so real and honest that I loved seeing her inner strength shine through.

My other favorite character was Aden’s best friend Marissa. Marissa is thin and popular when Aden is not, but the two girls support each other through every up and down. They choose to love each other even when they make mistakes. One of the best moments in their friendship is when Aden picks up Marissa after a party (and a heartbreak). In their little gestures, we can see how much they mean to each other.

“We need comfort food.” I say. “Greasy diner or donuts?”

“Greasy diner,” she says.

“Good choice.” And I squeeze her hand again. She squeezes back.

This book comes with its sad and heavy moments, but I definitely recommend it to anyone looking for a good contemporary novel about growing up and finding peace with who you are.

Magi: Sinbad no Bouken

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Adventure of Sinbad (or Magi: Sinbad no Bouken) is an anime coming from the same author as Magi and works as a prequel to the longer series. This show is only 13 episodes and is a fun fantasy/adventure anime focusing on world exploration. Yet, in many ways I found myself being disappointed in the plot and characters.

Our hero is a young Sinbad who sets out on his mission to start a new country that fights for justice for all citizens (this goal comes from his backstory: his father was killed when he was sent to war unwillingly). To do this Sinbad seeks power from mysteriously appearing landmarks called Dungeons (inside of which resides a fabled ‘King Power’). He also explores the many countries near him and meets their citizens (usually gaining a comrade or two along the way).

For me, there were three problems with this anime.

1st: Plot holes and Time Jumps

Several times throughout my viewing of Sinbad I found that the plot jumped rapidly forward during the most interesting and pivotal moments. Key examples of this are when Sinbad is working to capture the first dungeon and when he is given a month to get 1,000 gold coins.

During his dungeon capture, he successfully escapes the first room and when the door opens we see a long hallway with some more dragons still lurking inside. Instead of giving us the chance to see more of his resolve and cleverness to escape and make it to the throne room, the plot skips slightly forward and he is suddenly in the throne room. I realize this anime has a rapidly moving plot, but I was expecting him to fight for it at least a little more fiercely.

Again, when Sinbad arrives in the country of Reim, he is given an ultimatum by a merchant named Haran. In order to join the union and legally sell goods in Reim, he must have 1,000 gold coins for the fee, and this must happen in one month’s time before Haran returns to the city.

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So, Sinbad is left in an unfamiliar city with a nearly impossible task to complete. This sounds like the perfect challenge for our clever and resourceful hero, right? But suddenly the plot skips forward again and we see that one month has already passed. Does Sinbad have the gold coins? No. Furthermore, (seen when he is riding through the city with Haran later and doesn’t even know what the Coliseum is) he seems to know literally nothing about the city he supposedly spent a month living and working in.

I realize that this is just a short anime series developing Sinbad’s character, but the plot jumps left me confused, disappointed, and skeptical of Sinbad himself.

 

2nd: World Exploration and Setting

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One of the best things about this anime is the world exploration. Journeying along with Sinbad means we get to see the new people and countries he does. We got to meet the fierce warriors from Imuchakk (a country covered in ice), and the clever merchants from Reim, as well as the citizens of Sinbad’s home country Parthevia.

Yet I would argue that this exploration doesn’t go far enough. We meet these characters and places, but just barely. We are given a stereotype of them and forced to use that to fill in the rest of the information.

For example, the audience is informed that Reim is a country of merchants and traders, yet the only person we really interact with is Haran (later revealed to be from a different country himself). What do the actual people of the country act like? We might never know, considering that every other character who appears is a filler character with no real personality.

 

3rd: Character Motivation

Finally, the character motivation in this series seems unbelievable and completely unrealistic. I found myself unable to shake off my disbelief to fully enjoy the anime.

Let’s start with Sinbad himself. From the beginning, the audience is informed that a special person has been born and that Sinbad has a special power and is a completely unique person who will change the world.

Ok.

That’s fine.

But I need proof.

His goal is to create a new kingdom that will be kind to its citizens. Who will rule this new kingdom? Sinbad himself, of course. My issue is not just that he seeks power, but that nothing in the series seems to even try to make this realistic and show him what a long, hard battle that will be. It’s one thing to have a goal. It’s another to just get handed power because you were born “special” and then to never learn to use it in a cautious way (because… he’s Sinbad, and normal rules don’t apply, I guess?)

The other characters have motivation issues as well. In the Imuchakk arc, we are introduced to Hina (later, Hinahoho) who is trying to become a warrior by killing an Abare Narwhale. Sinbad accidentally steals this moment from him, which leads Hina to seek power from a recently appeared dungeon in order to prove himself. He goes in, actually passionate and determined to prove himself. Yet, by the end of the arc (when Sinbad has captured his second dungeon), Hina has a sudden change of heart and recognizes that he will never be king. He now sees that Sinbad is the true King-Vessel and his destined master. (All in the course of a single episode!)hinahoho

Overall, I did think this was an entertaining and interesting anime. I enjoyed watching it, but I was disappointed with some of the plot holes. This might be because the animators had to tell the story in just 13 episodes (I haven’t read the manga), or it might be because this is just supposed to function as a kind of prequel. But if a story has such an interesting premise, I feel it’s a waste to not explore that more.

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If you love fantasy adventure stories this might be a good anime to watch! But if you are looking for something a little more serious and thought-provoking this is not the show for you.